Never Too Late To Be Great


"Never Too Late To Be Great is about the power of thinking long. Drawing on wide research into ‘lead time’ and the ‘ten year rule’, personal development authority Tom Butler-Bowdon shows that contrary to popular belief, people, companies, products and ideas invariably need time to realise their potential. And yet, when we give ourselves slightly longer timeframes, anything is possible.

At the age you are now, many famous and remarkable people were only getting into their stride. Given longer life spans, it is likely that you have more time than you think to achieve your goals. This book will show you why, in all probability, your best is yet to come".


Never Too Late To Be Great

Published by Virgin/Random House 22 March 2012. To purchase, click on the book.


My most cheering read of 2012 so far is Never Too Late To Be Great by Tom Butler-Bowdon. If you haven’t yet started up that dream company or written that book in your head, it’s a hugely encouraging how-to manual. The underlying theme is, no matter your age, what you’ve done so far has ‘only set the scene for what you’ll achieve later on’. More encouragement comes from a roll call of late achievers. Jean Nidetch, founder of Weight Watchers, was 39 when she started it, Estee Lauder’s business had its first huge success with Youth Dew when she was 45. Need proof? Do the maths, says Butler-Bowdon. Say your productive live is from 20 to 80, 60 years. So, if you’re 35, you’ve only lived a quarter of it. Inspiring stuff.”

Brigid Moss, Red magazine
                                                                                              

According to a super inspirational new book Never Too Late To Be Great (Virgin) we are never too old to start something new no matter what our age.

Author Tom Butler-Bowdon has provided the antidote to quick-fix life solutions as his studies revealed that the role of time in achievement is always woefully under-reported. We all wish to fast-track our way to success but as Tom says: “The reality is that all genuine achievement takes decades, not weeks and the first 30 or 40 years of your life is really the platform built to warm you up for your success.”

                The good news he shares with us is that we tend to overestimate what we can achieve in a year but underestimate what we can achieve in a decade. With life spans increasing, he says, we have time to pursue big projects or get to the top of our careers.

                There are some youthful high achievers – the Madonnas, Mozarts and Mark Zuckerbergs which, he says, are the minority. Most people reap their rewards in later years. Mother Teresa was 40 when she founded her Missionaries of Charity order and Ray Kroc was 52 when he purchased the McDonald’s company and turned it into a global chain.

                The power of ‘thinking long’ gives us all a chance to exhale, stop pushing, comparing and feeling life’s passed us by. In fact we’re just getting started. What a relief.”

 

Carole Ann Rice, Daily Express                  

                                                                       

This classic motivational book sets out to explode the myth of overnight success and that age is against anyone who wants to break out in a creative or entrepreneurial new direction. Starting with Malcolm Gladwell’s theory that significant achievements rarely happen without a decade of intense work, former political advisor Butler-Bowdon goes on to provide pages and pages of evidence to back it up: Julia Child didn’t start learning to cook until she was 37; Estee Lauder worked on products for more than ten years before formally starting her business at 36; Ian Fleming published his first book at 45 and Benjamin Franklin invented bifocals when he was 78! This book is full of inspiration for people frustrated in their careers, facing mid-life crises, redundancy or retirement and provides a compelling case for taking ‘the long view’”.

 

The Pulse, NHS Choices

                      

“’At 40 you have 67% of your productive life ahead of you’. Tom Butler-Bowdon’s new book on this topic is great.”

 

Oliver Burkeman, Twitter

                     

No, it’s not another self-help book claiming to change your life in minutes. Tom Butler-Bowdon busts the promise of overnight success in his latest offering. By teaching the power of ‘thinking long’, Butler-Bowdon relaxes expectations of success and believes it takes at least 10 years of hard slog and practice to achieve results. Willing to go the distance? Order now – we’d tell you how it works, but we’ve got nine years and 11 months to go!”

 

Healthy magazine, UK

 

         “Tom is a bona fide expert on self-help.  He has spent years immersing himself in the literature of personal development, studying the works of others in great depth, before developing his own contribution.  I think he’s right to believe that he spotted a gap, a problem that begged for an answer.  Unless we take the time to delve a bit further into the lives of the people we admire, we’re prone to be duped by the illusion that success comes in an instant rather than slowly maturing over time as the result of a slow-burning process, often involving hard work and dedication for many years.  That illusion of instantaneous success can make people feel despondent.  Tom describes many strategies to help us take the long view. 

Tom’s a good writer and his style is very easy to follow and engaging. “Once you start reading this book you won’t want to put it down” is a cliché but in this case it’s true.  You could probably read this book in a day or two because it flows so nicely, a bit like reading a novel.   Tom’s a trustworthy and knowledgeable guide in the self-help field and his distilled wisdom will potentially save you the job of reading hundreds of other books – thereby liberating another decade of your time to achieve personal goals in life!”

 

Donald Robertson, UK College of Hypnosis & Hypnotherapy


Loved the range of examples and stories - Anthony Robbins next to Anthony Gormley, Napoleon Hill next to Jonathan Franzen. The breadth of the examples makes it very sympathetic to people who are not big readers of mainstream self-help. A great antidote to the 'instant success' mentality of many self-help books.”

 

Jules Evans, London Philosophy Club, author of Philosophy For Life and Other Dangerous Situations


 

 

 

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